Brown Chocholate Diamonds – Are They Any Good?

Brown or chocolate diamonds sound so exotic and enticing in the radio and television commercials. If you were to go to the big department store right after hearing it you would be drawn to the fine jewelry department’s banner that hangs from the ceiling announcing this breed of diamond as if it is the IT diamond.

Is it worth anything? Is it any good?

In the land of diamonds, clarity, natural proportions of depth and width and how the light emits off of it are just part of the equation. Clarity is the clearness, where white diamonds (clear) are considered the epitome of the greatest value of diamond and something of the gold standard.

chocolate colored diamondsIn some cases, a diamond may carry a natural color to it, which makes it rare. Though, on the other hand, there are efforts to clear a diamond. For instance, where a diamond has a yellow hue it is considered a blemish enough to want to make it appear clearer. What gemologists will do is cover it in a clear facade, which eventually will wear out or fade off, letting the yellow permeate through the outer color.

The idea with a diamond is that they can be an investment. Not only are they sought after for engagement rings, but also for the value they gain over time. A big clear diamond that has good natural proportions is the ideal and, therefore, worth more.

What Are They Worth?

So, then what is a brown or chocolate diamond? Is it natural or manufactured to give it such a stunning and attractive appearance?

It turns out that brown diamonds do occur often in nature. Though, again, the clear or white diamond is worth the most. The chocolate brown diamond does not have clarity and does not give off as much of a brilliant light as a natural clear diamond does.

Very nice chocolate diamondAs you have noticed, yes, there has been a definite push to get people to purchase brown or chocolate diamonds, as evidenced by the advertising campaigns. They are certainly useful in industries where diamonds are used in circuitry for computers to help conduct electricity. No doubt about it, brown diamonds are useful, and they can be attractive as well.

The inherent value is to the eye. In recent years, there has been an increased effort to offer up colorful diamonds to appeal to people. Though, a naturally occurring diamond that contains color is normally considered valuable, the chocolate diamond occurs with good frequency for it to play a role as a natural beauty without adding much more to its value.

That is clear from the availability of resales at cut-rate prices. It turns out, however, that beyond electronics, the brown diamonds can be impacted much like the yellow diamond to create a clear diamond, which appears at first glance to be worth more than it actually is. Check out our post on popular ring metals for more information.

Instead, the brown diamond can be changed to yellow or clear.

A brown or chocolate diamond is the most common hue of diamond. They sparkle and shine less, which makes them less valued as an adornment for jewelry lovers, in general. Though, increased marketing efforts have given this color more pull in the retail market more recently. It has been found that structure is deformed in a few manners.
The manner to alter a diamond is through high-pressure, which turns a diamond from brown to clear or yellow.

It turns out that the value of the brown diamond is all in the eye of the beholder. The next time you hear the commercial, or see a poster, you can decide for yourself whether you want a chocolate diamond or not.

Yellow Gold Rings – What is the best Diamond Color?

When you choose a yellow gold engagement ring you also want to make sure that you choose a great diamond.

Luckily, with yellow gold rings you can go way lower in diamond color and thus make a much better deal! This is exactly what we recommend you do!

What is the Best Diamond Color for Yellow Gold Rings

The best diamond color for yellow gold rings is way lower than what you would expect. Let’s explain it from the beginning!

What is the right diamond color for yellow gold rings?

As far as yellow gold rings are concerned you can choose a K colored diamond. This would not be possible to do for any other ring metal. For yellow gold though it is absolutely fine!

For more details on this please check out the following link:

http://yourdiamondteacher.com/diamond-4cs/color/best-diamond-color-for-yellow-gold-rings/

This post will show you exactly the ins and outs of choosing the right diamond color! It is easier than you think once you get your head wrapped around it!

What should you expect from the best diamond color?

Yellow Gold Rings with lots of Pave DiamondsWhen purchasing a diamond, which is more important clarity or color? This is a question diamond retailers and wholesalers hear all the time. It is often considered as a type of trade off. They may ask which is better, the diamond with VS2 clarity and H color or a diamond with SI1 clarity and G color? This question does not truly address the critical factors when choosing a diamond and may lead to a poor purchase choice.

Instead of setting a budget and then trying to find a diamond that meets those budget restrictions, it is a better idea to consider both clarity and color, but consider them independent of each other. Decide the minimum level that you will accept in both factors. This can help you select the diamond that best meets your criteria and it may actually cost less than your budgeted amount.

Yellow Gold Diamond Rings

It is possible to compromise on either color or clarity to get a bigger bang for your buck when purchasing a diamond. Depending on the diamond, the compromises may not even be noticeable to the human eye. The diamond will appear just a brilliant and beautiful as a higher grade diamond, but will cost much less.

The first consideration is to choose a diamond that appears to have no flaws. This is possible, especially if the flaws are very small and difficult to see. Most diamonds graded for clarity as VS1 or better will appear flawless. Diamonds graded in VS2, SI1 or SI2 are a good option if you are looking for a diamond that has no apparent flaws, but costs less than a VS1. In these grades, the diamonds will have flaws, but they may not be visible to the naked eye.

As you search within the VS2 through SI2 ranges, you may find many diamonds which are less expensive but still have a beautiful appearance. One caution, however, check each diamond over very carefully to ensure you are getting the best choice for the money. As you look at diamonds, search for the clearest diamond with the lowest possible clarity. This will generally make the best buy. When it comes to compromising on clarity to find the best deal on a diamond, always choose the diamond that is eye-clean since noticeable inclusions can distract from the diamond’s beauty.

Things to know about the diamond color

It is easier to compromise on diamond color than on clarity, but each should be considered separately. As you consider the color of a diamond, choose a color grade you can accept.

Pear Cut Diamond on a Yellow Gold RingRemember that the lower the color grade, the less expensive the diamond. When you want to get the best deal for the price, it is best to stay below the color grade G. Going any higher in color grade will decrease the cost/performance ratio. It is not likely you would notice any difference between the color grades.

Truthfully, you may notice a difference in color if you hold a G and D colored diamond up against each other and if they are both loose diamonds. However, if the diamonds are already set into rings, you will most likely not notice any difference at all between the diamond colors.

It is easiest to see a difference in diamond color from the back of the diamond. Once the diamond is set in a ring, the diamond’s color is harder to discern and the diamond may also pick up some of the colors of the metal.

Conclusion

Once you find a diamond that is eye-clean with no noticeable inclusions, the color is not nearly as important. Once the diamond is set, the color is not nearly as noticeable, but it should still be as high a grade as possible. Both of these factors are important and should be considered separately to find the best deal for the money.

For more information check out yourdiamondteacher.com.

And please make sure to read as much as you can about the diamond color before deciding to actually buy a diamond!